Read ECGs Better Than a Cardiologist

With a Qbank, strengthen your ECG-reading skills & be the person your colleagues turn to

Read ECGs Better Than a Cardiologist

Real ECGs,
Real Scenarios

Trade your flashcards for high-yield questions and explanations

Test your knowledge with real case studies and one-liners of context, allowing you to identify clues the same way you would in a real scenario.

All ECGs and questions were collected & created by Pendell Meyers, MD using content from his contributions to Dr. Smith’s ECG Blog.

Real ECGs, Real Scenarios

Be ready for the real patient

Build your knowledge with real cases & identify clues the same way you would at the bedside.

Read ECGs Better than a Cardiologist

Get 30-day, 90-day, or 365-day access to the ECG Qbank

Learn How To

Rapidly Interpret Real ECGs

Rapidly Interpret Real ECGs

Understand Intervals,
Morphology, and Blocks

Understand Intervals, Morphology, and Blocks

Understand R Wave Progression

Understand R Wave Progression

Easy Identification of
Bundle Branch Blocks

Easy Identification of
            Bundle Branch Blocks

Learn Lead Placement

Learn Lead Placement

Distinguish Wave Differences

Distinguish Wave Differences

From ECG to Cath Lab...

Find out if that STEMI was real

Find out if that STEMI was real

...All in Qbank Format.

A comprehensive guide for reading ECGs

Question

Which of the following best describes the morphology of normal sinus rhythm P waves?

A Lead I: biphasic (up-down); Lead II: upright
BLead I: upright; Lead II: biphasic (up-down)
CLead V1: biphasic (up-down); Lead II: upright
D Lead V1: upright; Lead II: biphasic (up-down)

Explanation

The P wave corresponds to atrial depolarization. The SA node is located in the right atrium near the superior vena cava, causing the direction of depolarization of normal P waves to be directed leftward and inferior, yielding upright (positive) P waves in most leads except aVR (which is oriented in the exact opposite direction). Because of the rightward placement of V1, the P wave is usually biphasic, with the initial positive deflection representing depolarization of the right atrium (toward the V1 electrode) and the subsequent negative depolarization representing the left atrium (away from the V1 electrode). Leads V1 and II are typically the best two leads for determining the P wave morphology and measurements, although this is not true in all cases.

The P wave corresponds to atrial depolarization
H. Pendell Meyers, M.D.

ECG Love

Created by H. Pendell Meyers, M.D.

After years of collecting real patient ECGs and teaching himself to interpret them using flash cards, Dr. Meyers found a better way. Using his time-tested study methods as a guide, this scenario-based Qbank makes it easier than ever to learn and interpret ECGs (even better than a cardiologist).

Read ECGs Better than a Cardiologist

Get 30-day, 90-day, or 365-day access to the ECG Qbank